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When the Canada Pension Plan was put in place on January 1,1966, it was a relatively simple retirement savings model. Working Canadians started making contributions to the CPP when they turned 18 years of age and continued making those contributions throughout their working life. Those who had contributed could start receiving CPP on retirement, usually at the age of 65. Once an individual was receiving retirement benefits, he or she was not required (or allowed) to make further contributions to the CPP. The CPP retirement benefit for which that individual was eligible therefore could not increase (except for inflationary increases) after that point.


For all but a very fortunate few, buying a home means having to obtain financing for the portion of the purchase price not covered by a down payment. For most buyers, especially first-time buyers, that means taking out a conventional mortgage from a financial institution.


The month of September marks both the end of summer and the beginning of the new school year for millions of Canadian children, teenagers, and young adults. And, whatever the age of the student or the grade level to which he or she is returning, there will inevitably be costs which must be incurred in relation to the return to school. Those costs can range from a few hundred dollars for school supplies for grade school and high school students to thousands (or tens of thousands) of dollars for the cost of post-secondary or professional education.


The administrative policy of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) with respect to charities has been that no more than 10% of a registered charity’s resources can be allocated to non-partisan political activity. Where the CRA views a charity as having exceeded that threshold it may impose sanctions, up to and including revocation of a charity’s charitable registration status.


Two quarterly newsletters have been added—one dealing with personal issues, and one dealing with corporate issues.


For most of the year, taxpayers live quite happily without any contact with the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). During and just following tax filing season, however, such contact is routine – tax returns must be filed, Notices of Assessment are received from the CRA and, on occasion, the CRA will contact a taxpayer seeking clarification of income amounts reported or documentation of  deductions or credits claimed on the annual return. Consequently, it wouldn’t necessarily strike taxpayers as unusual to be contacted by the CRA with a message that a tax amount is owed or, more happily, that the taxpayer is owed a refund by the Agency. Consequently, it’s the perfect time for scam artists posing as representatives of the CRA to seize the opportunity to defraud taxpayers.


By now, most Canadians are familiar with the use and the benefits of a tax-free savings account (TFSA), which have proven to be a very popular savings vehicle since they were introduced in 2009. What’s proven to be harder to do is keeping track of one’s annual TFSA contribution limit. The annual TFSA contribution limit contribution allowed by law has been something of a moving target, subject to change after change by successive governments. As well, withdrawals made from a TFSA are added to one’s annual contribution limit, but not until the following taxation year – a fact that has escaped many TFSA holders and sometimes even their financial advisers. And finally, the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) used to provide information on a taxpayer’s current year TFSA contribution limit on the annual Notice of Assessment, but that’s no longer the case, meaning that the taxpayer has to make an extra effort to obtain that information.


In recent years, there has been a great deal of public discussion about the availability (and the viability) of federal income support programs for retirees. It’s not news that Canada’s population is aging, and the demands placed on government-sponsored retirement income programs will of course increase as greater numbers of Canadians reach the age at which they will be entitled to receive monthly benefit payments from those programs.


For several decades, Canadian families have received financial assistance from the federal government to help offset the cost of raising children, through a range of benefits and allowance programs. Those programs have taken a variety of forms, from direct payments to parents to credits provided on the annual tax return. Some amounts provided under some such programs were taxable, while others were not. The one constant throughout those decades is that such programs are in a continual state of change and revision, resulting in a sometimes confusing patchwork of entitlements.